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Take the Calculated Risk

Isn’t it About Time You Rolled the Dice? Take the Risk, take the Gamble, Play the Hand

We’ve lost our identity as what it really means to be Americans and both Conservatives and Liberals are to blame for this mess.

 
On one side, Conservatives routinely believe love of country is to die for it even if any armed conflict isn’t the best option. In other words, it’s either submit to your country’s authority, or else.

 
Liberals believe the United States to be a greedy corporate empire that gets rich off the expense of the masses, but believes government intervention is the road to freedom, which has never worked.

 
Libertarians believe in playing by one’s own rules should be number one and that any road to personal freedom and prosperity defeats anything Conservative or Liberal America offers. We play by a different set of rules.

 

Take the Risk

And when it comes to risk, us Libertarians love rolling the dice and seeing what we can uncover. We’re risk-takers and we love every second of it. Sure, we know we’ll fail at times, but at others we’ll find prosperity when we climb the highest mountains.

 
We have goals to work toward, passions to pursue, and we’re not about to follow the Conservative mantra of working for a company that’ll take care of us and our families. Hell no!

 

As Libertarians we’ll take care of ourselves, thank you very much.

 
We’re individualists, who refuse to get a job simply for compensation, benefits, and security. We’re freedom-seekers, and we seek freedom over security, failing as we stand than “succeeding” as we kneel. Because when we fail enough, we will succeed, and it’s the beauty of taking the calculated risk. We have the ambition to ride out the storm.

 
Unlike Liberal America, we won’t take your government handout; you can keep it. We don’t like tax credits, instead we want to pay for anything we decide to buy. They can keep their government-mandated healthcare; Libertarians like to take care of themselves and even if we were better off with government, we’d decline.

No Pride Needed

No, Conservatives, we’re not going to show our pride in working for a brand name and helping that brand name achieve its goals. We just don’t care enough for your company or your dreams; we have our own to work toward, and they’re more important to us.

 
But thanks for trying to coax us into a little retirement plan, benefits, and a comfortable salary to bribe us against following our own path. I know we’re hard workers. In fact, Libertarians are the hardest workers you’ll ever hire.

 

 

Except, we’re ambitious people and you, you’re company is just small work.

 
Then, we’ll go on to start our own brand. We’ll pursue our passion, our dreams, and walk straight into Hell for a while.

 
Why?

 
Because we care that much about the product we have in our mind and our goal is to relay such a product to as many people as possible because it’s beneficial to them. Not only that, but we also see the benefits of what we’re doing and your little offer to us just isn’t, nor will it ever be, beneficial enough.

 

Pursuing Passion

No, we’re not just going to work some stupid job and start something we’re not passionate about.

 
Yeah, I know, the whole market demand thing, but someone else can start their business in it. Hey, if I don’t like something I simply won’t pursue it but if I love something I’ll pursue it like I have no other option.

 

I’m an INFJ, I’m only pursuing something worthwhile. If I don’t find you or your product worthwhile, I’ll pass, even on $80,000 a year. I’ll make my own $80,000.

 

How does that sound?

 
No, I won’t give myself another option.

 
I’m pursuing, and that’s all there is to it.

 
I’m pursuing writing because a) I love it and b) there’s a message to spread to the world and it’s the best way to do so.

 
But, isn’t it hard to make a living in it?

 
I think anything worth pursuing is hard to make a living in. Writing is no different, and there are numerous ways to make money here.

 
1. Creative writing. It’s the best. Write a book, market, promote, and sell. Learn SEO and metadata to increase your chances of success. But dammit, take your time. There’s a lot of legwork involved if you want to get this thing in front of people without shouting ‘Buy my book’ on Twitter and annoying the hell out of us.

 
2. Informative e-books. While creative writing can entertain, or at least entertain while informing, others want to be informed. What are you good at? I have a fitness background and an endless fountain of ideas how people can adopt a fitness background. Why not sell my knowledge? Hey, people want to whip their asses into shape in a convenient way, so why not sell it to them, because my ways are strikingly convenient. Sure, there’s work involved and all, but at least you don’t need expensive gym equipment or a special diet; just willpower.

 
3. Blog, dammit. Drive people to your blog the same way you drive people to your book with sound SEO and metadata. I’m busy converting my past works to SEO, and in the week since I’ve started using SEO, my traffic has seen a slight increase. I suspect that trend to continue. Short-term goal is 100 daily views, long-term is 500. I’ll talk about my books and other works, but I’m not telling people to buy them. It’s your decision and if you want it, you’ll find it, or it’ll find you.

 
4. Freelance. Find websites you love to read and see if you can contribute. Some sites even pay a hefty sum, so your time is more than worth it. Even for sites that don’t pay, by submitting and getting published, you’ll receive credibility in your field. Just last week I started studying freelance opportunities and came across how to submit to one of my favorite sites, Mises.org.

 
Last week, I made a list of blogs, websites, and magazines to submit my work and came up with over sixty. After I compiled my list, I crafted several pitches just to get in the flow of proposing my work. This week, the goal is to craft an article worth submitting and hopefully within the next week or two, will submit.

 
I’m very new to freelance, so this is another walk into uncharted waters.

 

Research, Research, and more Research

When you pursue, I can’t stress enough how important it is to research. You need to know the in’s and out’s, even the technicalities like SEO and metadata. The more you research, the more edge you’ll have over others you might be competing with. But if you want to launch your book, then do all the legwork like social media, a blog, and screaming ‘Buy my book, so be it.

 
This time last year, I was hoping to launch Lord of Columbia, my debut creative work. However, I didn’t know anything about the business side of operations and wisely started researching to see how I could give the work the best chance to succeed.

 
What I found out will save me a lot of headache and wtf’s down the road. From book covers, to choosing a title, to choosing categories, sub-categories, keywords, book description, all the way down to my About the Author, I researched every single detail.

 

Conclusion

I hope I motivated you to inch another step closer to so too can take the calculated risk, roll the dice, and gamble for a brighter day.

 
Sure, it’s a scary thought, especially when your current gig may be paying you a nice income and benefits. Calculating risk versus current security, however, plays into the whole security over freedom mantra. Don’t take security over freedom. Instead, take the risk. I’m confident years from today you’ll look back and see how foolish it was to have all this built in fear of what if something goes wrong.

 
Instead, worry about all that’ll go right. It’s true. People worry about finding success because while many of us have had a time where we made a good living, success in our chosen field, our passion, is a whole new ballgame.

 
And with that, I’d like to thank all my readers on My Freedom Flame, please come back soon.

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One thought on “Take the Calculated Risk

  1. Pingback: My Freedom Flame: Challenging Mainstream thoughtHow to Rebuild Your Franchise: Trust the Process

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