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Trust the Process

Use Primary Income to Fund Your Passion

 

Trust the Process, it’s a statement used by the NFL’s Cleveland Browns and the NBA’s Philadelphia 76ers. Something similar can be said for defending World Series Champion Houston Astros. The Astros saw the process through, the process is paying off for the 76ers, and the Browns have set the stage after going 4-44 since 2015, bottoming out at 0-16 in 2017.
So, the process is, well, a process. It involves growing pains, questioning one’s sanity on why they’re pursuing their passion in favor of taking the safe way with a salary and benefits, early mornings, late evenings, and as Bon Jovi once stated, living on a prayer.

 

 

Early Growing Pains

This is part where one detaches from their safe space and embarks on the journey they’ve always wanted. It’s an adventure, but as in any classic tale, each adventure begins with terrible trouble for the protagonist, who in this case is you.
I remember when I first left Weirton and set up shop outside Pittsburgh. It wasn’t fun. I operated at a massive loss for a while and longed to be back in my bubble back in Weirton, where I developed a little empire among both clients and members.
I was starting over with nothing. No friends, no clients, and no one to turn to. Now, Pittsburgh is only twenty-five-minute hike from Weirton, and when I first ventured into the South Hills I was a good hour away. So, I had no one within a fifty-mile radius. It was me and no one else.
The massive losses continued as I went to the East End in White Oak and Murrysville, picking up a little progress but nowhere near enough to make a sound living. Finally, I turned to Wexford in the North Hills, where I’d been ever since.
While Wexford was a turning point, the ride got tougher. Income improved, but the ride became tough. And it still is, but the light is there.
Also, during this time, I decided to pursue writing over fitness. While fitness was my motivation to go off on my own, my writing hobby surpassed fitness and the will to get libertarian principles into the mainstream became a must.
Now, I’m looking into both avenues, giving writing an edge and hoping to make the primary living off writing. Creating stories with a libertarian-based message is something I can reach to more people and it’s fulfilling. As a trainer, I can only change a few dozen in a small area. Big difference.

 

 

Freedom Number

As mentioned earlier, working in Wexford was the break I needed to at least eek a profit while embarking on my true calling. It steadied the ship and allowed me to find my freedom number which is the money I needed to make to break even and put a few dollars back for saving.
For those of us working jobs we find unfulfilling, lacking purpose, or not of our interest, the freedom number is even more important. Our freedom number allows us to limit the hours we need to work.
When was the last time someone said that?
Yes, you can limit the number of hours you need to work so you can work on what you do love so you can become what you want to be in favor of droning away at a job you don’t want.
For myself, I can make $650 a week by working thirty hours. I travel one hour to work each day, six days per week, so we’re looking at a grand total of forty-two hours I have to invest in work. This gives me one-hundred and twenty-six hours per week of freedom. I sleep six hours per night, giving me eighty-four hours to write, research, and read topics relevant to my passion.
The freedom number will set you free.

 

 

Conclusion

Sure, the process is tough, especially in the beginning. However, seeing it through and reaching the freedom number will give you the time you need to invest in yourself. When you reach your freedom number, stress at work will decrease because you’ll be there less. Your passion takes center stage in your life and your primary income can be shunted to one side, because its only purpose is to fund your passion and your cost of living.
An everyday job should be something to fund yourself while you build for your future by pursuing what you want. Do something you wanted to do when you were growing up. Even if it takes a few years, ask yourself if you’d rather be somewhere else a few years from today. If you answered ‘yes,’ it’s time to pursue freedom and kick your current job to the curb regardless of benefits involved. Do what fulfills you, not your bank account, because your income will take care of itself when you start being your own boss and making money off your passion. Trust the Process, and Execute the Process.

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